The Uncommon life of Alfred Warner in Six Days by Juliet Conlin

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Review 3.5 stars out of 5

Update finished reading this!

Review

What an interesting idea for a book.  Quite a unique angle to consider an elderly man who has been hearing benevolent voices the whole of his life.  What surprised me, until I read the authors Afterword, is that I never questioned whether the voices were real.  I automatically assumed they were supernatural as the book draws you in to Alfred’s inner world.  Alfred (the protagonist) is a really lovely character btw!  Very easy to warm to.

In all this book should have worked, and have been worthy of 4 stars, but I found myself sometimes trudging laboriously through parts of it, perhaps it was the sheer incredibility of the events that happened to Alfred, maybe it was just a tad too long; whatever it was it did not hit the wow factor for me.

That said do not let it put you off as a lot of reviewers loved this book.

 

Previous:  Had this one sitting on the shelf for ages.  Glad I set up a reading challenge of 10 books between June and November 2018.  This gives me the motivation to actually read some of the books I have purchased.  I am enjoying the challenge, I forgot how much I love reading for leisure.  Currently on number 8/10…so according to Goodreads on track lol.  Happy reading to you all.

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Eleanor Oliphant is completely fine by Gail Honeyman

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Review

4/5 stars

A really good read. Eleanor is a complex and self-sufficient figure. She certainly has a unique style with how she deals with life. I quite like her. The book is funny and sad. My favourite part was the first section of the book. I enjoyed her use of a wide vocabulary lol, love learning new words. A bright lady who has a story to tell. Recommend.

This has got some rave reviews on Amazon and Goodreads, hence I thought I would give it a go.  Five stars are generally only given for wow books lol, so a four out of five for popular fiction is a good rating.

Recommend for anyone wanting an easy-read with an interesting storyline about a woman living her life on the fringes of society but how an act of kindness snowballs to reveal a world she had never considered before.  Good luck to her – a lovely feel-good book.

 

‘Gods and Legions’ by Michael Curtis Ford

Perhaps I might try a completely different type of fiction, never thought of reading about the Roman era but just seen this great review and now interested.

Swift Coffee

It’s time I write about this historical fiction book that I’ve actually read a while ago now… Grab your smelling coffee, and run through my thoughts! This is not going to be very long, I think. It’s… compact. 🙂

Képtalálat a következőre: „gods and legions michael curtis ford�

(Goodreads/Amazon)

Discovery:

It’s a book co-owned by my boyfriend and I. He enjoyed this one, and the first book in this loose series very much, and his enthusiasm was sticky! I wanted to read them, too. To see my thoughts on the previous book, click here: ‘The Ten Thousand’ by Michael Curtis Ford!

Brainstorm:

I read this book a bit slower than the other one, and because they’re very similar in style, and in a way in the topic, too, I felt I had to read other types of books between the two (as it happens to me all the time). This one was more of…

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The Dry by Jane Harper

 

The Dry

Really good 4.5 stars

Review

Not my usual genre – crime thrillers, but found this captivating and ushered me into investigating the murders.   Lol, I had literally accused everyone in the town within the first few chapters!  The plot is good.

It is set in Kiewarra, a hot, desolate, bakingly dry town in the Australian outback.  The description reaveals hot the starkness of hot, empty fields stretching as far as the eye can see is echoed in a community on the very edge!

Faulk (the main protagonist) and Sergeant Raco, are two of the most likeable characters and one feels honoured to be introduced.  Faulk returns to his hometown Kiewarra after being run out of town as a teen, on circulating suspicions about his part in a girls death. His father accompanies him and it is sad to see a middle-aged man leaving behind the land and farm his grandparents built up, to relocate to a city in which he never quite fits in.   Faulk returns to the town as an adult reigned in by a letter he receives from his old best friend’s dad ‘Luke lied. You lied’.  They are burying Luke, his wife, and child…..a suspected murder by Luke who then takes his own life.

All the characters are well rounded and believable.  This is the kind of book I did not want to come to an end; the characters still seeming to continue their lives in Kiewarra and Melbourne even though the chapters remain unwritten.  I am glad to have caught a glimpse of their lives and I recommend this book to all who like crime thrillers.

The opening quote sums up the setting for the story, the bleakness of the landscape, and the crime: ‘It wasn’t as though the farm hadn’t seen death before, and the blowflies didn’t discriminate.  To them there was little difference between a carcass and a corpse’.

#FollowFriday – the blog edition #10

❤ Bibi's Book Blog ❤

Follow Friday 01

Did you know you know #FF is short for #FollowFriday? A Twitter trend created by Twitter users as a shout out, a show of appreciation, a nice thing to do. Each Friday, you recommend Twitter profiles that you appreciate and enjoy to all of your followers. This week I’ve decided to bring the Follow Friday feeling to my blog, too, and dedicate this post to the top posts or bloggers I’ve read this week.

Going forward this also means, that if you want me to consider your blog, or a particular post, please email me on bibisbookblog@hotmail.com – if you want me to mention you that week, please make sure to email me before Wednesday @8pm (UK time). Oh and to make things easier on me, please write “Follow Friday” in the subject field.

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This week I’ve received two emails from fellow bloggers, that would like to be featured…

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A Universe from Nothing by Lawrence Krauss

Review of  a popular science book ‘A Universe from Nothing’ by Lawrence Krauss

a universe from nothing

 

Review

2/5 stars

Oh dear!  Firstly, the topic is fascinating in exploring how the Big Bang might have started, and the ultimate inflation of the universe.  Indeed chapter 8 ‘A grand accident’ is wonderful.  However, the book is ruined by the continuous reference to religion as being superfluous.  The remarks are almost derogatory sometimes.  This detracted from the book.  The other aspect was the book perhaps relied upon a better background in physics than ‘popular-science book reader’ level!

I personally did not warm to the authors writing style.

I think it would be helpful to put in the synopsis of the book that it is anti-religion and also that it may require some background knowledge of physics.   That said chapter 8 really did make me think…..the idea of multiverses and how they could occur by creation of pockets in space.  The underlying theme is that space is filled with a mysterious dark energy and it propels inflation of the universe at ever increasing speeds.  It is not a bad book, just a difficult book, both in writing style and grasping the concepts.  I did have to re-read paragraphs a few times!

I will continue my popular science reading and maybe my level of physics will increase enough to enjoy this book if it is read again.

Musings – Writing Book Reviews

Absolutely agree with this blogger Shalini

Shalini's Books & Reviews

I have been criticized by bloggers, friends for putting up a negative review of a book or using strong words to dislike a book. I have been thinking for so many months as to what is wrong with that?!!

When I can gush about a book and recommend it and give it the highest rating, then why can’t I criticize a book?!!

I am often told that the author has put in hard work and effort in that book and it would hurt them. I understand hard work. People who know me, know that I am always working, I hardly sleep. It is my hard earned money which I have earned after working very hard to invest in another person’s hard work. Why should I not get my money’s worth?!! Books are expensive for me.

I get pulled up by my bosses, they don’t then see my hard work…

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